Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Information
Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Information
Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Information Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Information
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Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Information
Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Information
Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Vacations, Reports and Rhinelander Wisconsin Fishing Information

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A LOOK BACK AT FISHING THE RHINELANDER AREA

Rhinelander was first settled by lumbering interests.  In 1858 a rough trail was brushed out to allow lumberjacks and equipment to get near the huge stands of white pint trees on the shores of the Wisconsin River.  Early history books chronicling the early days of Rhinelander feature names such as Brown, Lynch, Helms, Curran and Shepard.

During the year of 1882 a rough mud and timber dam was constructed on the Wisconsin River just a football field length north of the present dam.  This rough dam was constructed to form a holding pond for the lumber being floated down the River.  The pond was called Boom Lake.  By 1892 there were eight sawmills along the shores of Boom Lake.

The loggers who were working along the shores of Boom Lake talked about the huge fish (muskies) that would swim along the log booms.  More than a few of these huge muskies were dispatched with a pike pole.

By the early 1900's farsighted businessmen could see the end of the logging era was near.  In 1903 the decision was made to enter the paper making business.  The present dam across the Wisconsin River was built in 1903 for the purpose of generating power for the new paper mill.

Just east of Rhinelander another rough dam was erected on the North Pelican River for logging purposes.  This dam formed the five-lake Moens Lake Chain.  These early rough dams would be blasted out periodically to permit logs to float downstream and then the dams were rebuilt.

With all the logging camps in the Rhinelander area being vacated in the early 1900's there were many places for visiting anglers to stay.  They arrived by trains, which formerly carried logs, and were taken the logging camps by horse pulled wagons.  The fishing for muskies, northerns, bass and walleyes was described as outstanding.

Lakes such as Boom, Thompson, Crescent, the Moens Chain and Ema were recognized as outstanding fishing destinations for those who could secure access.  The Hodag Sports Club was formed in the early 1900's and their goal was to secure access sites to the many area lakes.  Early workers for this club were men by the names of Ed Young, Art Barlow, Bob Bastian, Herb Schauder and many others to numerous to mention.

Near the middle of the Century Leo's Sport Shop, located in downtown Rhinelander, ran a weekly and annual fishing contest.  There was an icebox with a glass top on the sidewalk in front of the store, which displayed trophy catches throughout the fishing season.  This icebox was a major tourist attraction, which was also regularly visited by most area anglers.

Many of the logging camps near Rhinelander were converted to fishing resorts catering to visiting anglers.  To this day several of the long-time resorts in the area are these converted logging camps.

To the present day the Rhinelander area is recognized as a great fishing destination.  Fishing for walleyes, muskies, northerns, bass and panfish continues to be excellent.  Annually, trophy muskies are caught from the waters of Boom Lake and the Wisconsin River as well as Lake Thompson and the Moens Chain.

Some feel that the Rhinelander area is an excellent, un-pressured fishing destination since many anglers drive past on their way to more publicized areas.  It is still possible to escape the heavy fishing pressure on some of the highly publicized lakes and fish the Rhinelander Area lakes at a slower pace. 

Oneida County, Wisconsin has in excess of 1100 lakes, second in number only to Vilas County.  With over 1100 lakes the major decision to be made when fishing the Rhinelander Area is what lake should we concentrate on today.  The lakes vary from numerous crystal clear lakes to those with tea colored water.

The three flowages, The Rainbow Flowage, The Willow Flowage and The Rhinelander Flowage provide many acres of fishing water with the potential of producing both numbers of fish as well as trophies.  An angler can spend an entire fishing season fishing the waters in the Rhinelander Area and still have plenty of new water to explore.

LAKE PROFILES

Lake Name: Boom Lake Flowage
(Boom Lake, Thunder Lake, Lake Creek, Bass Lake, Rhinelander Flowage River)

  • Location: Oneida County/ Rhinelander Wisconsin between Highways 17 & 47
  • Accessibility: Numerous boat landings and accesses
  • Accommodations: Resorts, Park and Picnic Areas
  • Surface Water Area: 1763 Acres
  • Shoreline: 35.8 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 30 Feet
  • Water Color: Clear
  • Lake Type: Drainage
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 50% Sand 35% Muck 10% Gravel
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Musky, Northern Pike, Largemouth Bass, Panfish (Crappie Perch Bluegills)
  • Secondary Game Fish Species: Walleye, Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

Boom Lake is a flowage of the Wisconsin River.  It has a very healthy and diverse fishery. The flowage has a strong population of panfish with crappie being the most sought after. The crappies are caught year round with spring and winter (late ice) being a couple of the best times. Perch are also available and run good size.

Spring and late ice are some of the best times to fish them as well. Bass of both Largemouth and Smallmouth are here in good numbers. Largemouth in the 6 lb. range are not out of the question. Smallmouth run good size as well 5-6 lb. are available. Walleye are present but are not a primary target on the flowage.

Most of the walleye that are caught tend to be in the river. Musky is one of the primary targets. Boom Lake is an outstanding fishery for musky as it offers both numbers at times but has definite trophy potential.

Muskies in the 50's are seen and caught annually in the flowage.  Boom is good for muskies year round but in the summer expect some boat traffic so I would suggest fishing early and late. Top water and bucktails seem to be the baits of choice through out the late spring and summer. Jerk baits and cranks really shine in the late summer and fall.

Overall, Boom Lake is a strong fishery with nice fish of all species available.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

Boom Lake is one lake in Oneida Co. that is definitely capable of producing a giant fish. Every year this lake gives up some really nice fish. The neat thing about Boom Lake is that the fish can be found in basically the same spots from opening day until ice-up. The seasonal movements on this lake are very minimal. If you find them in June, chances are they will be in the same spot in October or November.

Everyone likes to fish weeds and there is not doubt that weeds can be dynamite on Boom, however, DO NOT overlook the wood and rock structure on this lake. Some of the biggest fish in my boat have come from wood and rock structure out of this lake.

My favorite lures on Boom are orange bellied glide baits, gold and chartreuse crankbaits and surface baits. This lake has a great surface bait bite even when it is windy!

On a side note, be careful on this body of water. The submerged stumps and dead heads can be dangerous.


Lake Name: Crescent Lake

  • Location: Oneida County / West of Rhinelander on Highway 8
  • Accessibility: Boat landing with parking off Highway 8
  • Accommodations: Resorts, Park
  • Surface Water Area: 326 Acres
  • Shoreline: 7.4 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 32 Feet
  • Water Color: Clear
  • Lake Type: Spring
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 30% Sand 25% Gravel 25% Rubble 20% Muck
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Musky, Walleye, Panfish (Crappie, Perch, Bluegill)
  • Secondary Game Fish Species: Northern Pike, Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

Crescent Lake is a clear water lake. It does get a bit of a bloom at times but stays relatively clear year round. Musky and Walleye are the primary targets here.

Walleye tend to run in the average size with an occasional 5-6 lber being caught. The fish here tend to be weed related and will move in shallow at times. The lake has many fish cribs, which will also concentrate the walleye. The baits of choice tend to be jigs in the 1/16 - 1/8 ounce size tipped with live bait. It takes a little knack to be able to jig them out of the weeds. One might also anchor up and try some slip bobbers in the morning and evening. I have caught walleye all day long out here but overcast days tend to be the best.

Musky also are weed and crib related.  Similar to the walleye the musky fishing tends to be better early and late in the day. Bucktails in natural colors work well here. Jerkbaits and cranks are also wise choices. In the heat of the summer Crescent can tend to be busy with boat traffic, which makes it a good night lake for both Musky and Walleye.

Do not overlook the Bass. Crescent is a good Bass lake. It holds quality largemouth and Smallmouth. The largemouth tend to be weed related. Jig and Pigs would be a good bet here. The Smallmouth concentrate on the cribs and steeper rock and sand breaks.  Tubes and crankbaits work very well in this situation. Panfish are here in good numbers. Mainly it is a bluegill and perch fishery. Fish the weeds with small jigs and live bait.

I would classify Crescent as an action lake with and occasional trophy being caught.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

Crescent Lake is one of the most popular lakes in the Rhinelander area to fish and with good reason. Crescent has a good population of muskies and can also produce some very nice fish.

The bite on Crescent is usually a weed edge bite. Most of the weed edges can be found along some of the various shorelines. Keep your boat in 14-15 feet of water and cast towards shore. The neat thing about this lake is that it is fairly clear and the fish tend to show themselves very regularly. I have seen upwards of 20 fish in a day while fishing out here.

One unique thing about Crescent is that because it is fairly clear most people think that the lake won't turn on until several weeks after the opener. That couldn't be farther from the truth. Even though this lake is clear, some of the best fishing of the year out here can be from opening day until the 4th of July.

Once the 4th of July arrives the lake sees a TON of boating and skiing pressure, along with fishing pressure. During this time of year, I resort to night fishing out here.

I like to use crankbaits and bucktails on this lake. Surface baits can also work, but the majority of my fish on this lake come on cranks and bucktails. One of the most productive colors on this lake is blue and white. Try a white bladed bucktail with blue hair and you might be surprised with a big fish.


Lake Name: George Lake

  • Location: Oneida County / Southeast of Rhinelander on Highway 8
  • Accessibility: Boat landing with dock on East shoreline
  • Accommodations: Resorts, Campground
  • Surface Water Area: 446 Acres
  • Shoreline: 5.5 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 26 Feet
  • Water Color: Stained
  • Lake Type: Drainage
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 55% Sand 20% Gravel 15% Muck 10% Rubble
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Northern Pike, Walleye, Panfish ( Crappie Perch Bluegill)
  • Secondary Game Fish Species: Musky, Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

Lake George is a unique piece of water. This lake has many resorts on its shores and sees a substantial amount of boating and fishing pressure, but it continues to produce fish.

This water has a fair to good population of crappies. These fish will congregate in the reeds in the spring to spawn, from there, they will disperse into sunken brush piles and suspend out on the many rock bars I the lake. If you can locate them, you can catch them. As far as size goes, they tend to run in the average 10-12" but some nice slabs are in there.

Walleye are abundant here. They tend to run in the 12-16" on average but every year some nice eyes have come out of here I the 27-30" class fish. The walleye tend to be very rock oriented. Work jigs and live bait up and down the rocks until you fid the depth they prefer at that time.

Bass are available both Large and Small mouth. Cast cranks and tubes along the rock breaks for the smallies and concentrate on the reeds and weeds for the Largemouth.

The northern Pike are weed related. Throw bass spinner baits and small musky plugs to connect with the pike. I prefer white, chartreuse, or orange colors.

Musky fishing is good here as well. I would concentrate on the weed edges early in the year using small twitch baits and bucktails. Do not be afraid to try the rocks as many musky are caught by the walleye anglers. As the year progresses they could be anywhere from weeds to the rocks. When the water begins to cool, I would concentrate on the rocks with cranks and jerk baits.

This lake because of the many resorts does see boat and fishing pressure so early and late would be the ticket here.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

If you are going to hit George make sure that check out the numerous rock piles and reed beds on this lake. This lake is loaded with awesome looking musky structure and the fish can be anywhere out here. George can also give up some very nice. This is another lake that can see a LOT of fishing pressure so keep that in mind when heading out here. Early mornings and evenings can be your best bet.

The stained water out here calls for bright colored lures. Orange seems to work the best, along with chartreuse and don't forget bright green.

The fish on this lake will hold in the shallow reed cover. Sometimes the only way to get them is to throw spinnerbaits up into the reeds. If you are just casting to the edge of the reeds it may not be enough. Your casts need to get 2-3 feet into the reeds to contact fish.

One last thing, the fish out here seem to really like tail rotating topwater lures such as Tally Wackers, Stompers and Topraiders.


Lake Name: Hancock Lake

  • Location: Oneida County / West of Rhinelander on Highway K
  • Accessibility: Boat landing with dock on Southeast shoreline
  • Accommodations: Resorts
  • Surface Water Area: 259 Acres
  • Shoreline: 7.1 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 22 Feet
  • Water Color: Stained
  • Lake Type: Drainage
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 50% Muck 30% Sand 10% Gravel 5% Boulder 5% Rubble
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Northern Pike, Largemouth Bass, Panfish
    ( Crappie Perch Bluegill )
  • Secondary Game Fish Species: Musky, Walleye, Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

Lake Hancock is primarily a weed and wood lake.

Panfish are abundant here but run a bit on the small side. They will concentrate on the bog edges and on the downed wood. Use worms and minnows under bobbers to catch them. The crappies and bluegills will intermingle in the weeds here.

 

Northern pike are common here. Concentrate on the weed edges with small bucktails and spinerbaits in white or bright colors. There are some nice pike in here but the average will be in the low 20’s to 30” class fish.

 

Largemouth are here in good numbers with some quality fish in the 5lb range caught here. The downed wood and bogs tend to be the best producers of the larger fish. Although the slop and lily pads are a ton of fun with top water baits slowly worked over the top. This will get you some awesome blowups with Largemouth.

 

Walleye are here in good numbers but can be tough to catch. With Hancock’s expansive wed flats the walleye will move around allover in them. I have seen 8+ lb walleyes here. Jigs and minnows worked slowly while drifting through the weeds work the best.

 

Musky are in good numbers with the average 34”- 42” most common. Every year someone gets an upper 40 to 50” class fish out of here. Bucktails and jerkbaits work the best in the weeds. I like perch, and sucker patterns here. This is a good early season bet before the weeds get to thick.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

Hancock lake is one of the most fun lakes in Oneida Co. to fish. If the fish are on out here the action can be outstanding. It is virtually impossible in this lake to make a bad cast. The entire shoreline can and will hold fish at all times of the year. Some days the huge cabbage beads will hold active fish, while other days the downed timber on the shorelines will hold them, and then other days the fish in the river area by the dam will be very active.

The unique thing about this lake is that the clarity of the water will vary from month to month. In June the water can be fairly clear, then as the summer progresses the water tends to get cloudy, then once the water cools in the fall it will clear back up again. Don't worry if the water is a little cloudy when you fish it, the fish will still be active, you just need to use brighter color lures such as orange and chartreuse.

I like topwater lures and bucktails on this lake. Topraiders and Hawg Wobblers work well out here. My favorite bucktail on this lake is a white blade and black tail.

In the fall the sucker bite on Hancock can be dynamite. Use 12-18 inch suckers rigged on a quick strike rig and set the hook the instant the musky grabs the sucker. Fish the suckers along the deep weed edges and in the channel area near the dam.


Lake Name: Moen Chain
(Moen Lake, Second Lake, Third Lake, Fourth & Fifth Lakes)

  • Location: Oneida County / West of Rhinelander Wisconsin on Highway C
  • Accessibility: Boat landing with parking on west shore
  • Accommodations: Resorts & Campgrounds
  • Surface Water Area: 1152 Acres
  • Shoreline: 12.9 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 14 Feet
  • Water Color: Dark Brown
  • Lake Type: Drainage
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 75% Sand 15% Gravel 10% Muck
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Musky, Walleye, Panfish ( Crappie Perch Bluegills)
  • Secondary Game Fish Species: Northern Pike, Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

The Moens chain consists of five interconnected bodies of water.

The chain has good numbers and size on the crappies. Late ice is a good time to get some nice slabs right into the spawn. When they come shallow, I would concentrate on the reeds and the downed wood in the water. This is dark water so these fish may be in a foot of water or less. As the summer roles in they will congregate on the many man made cribs that inhabit the chain. On the Moens chain, the cribs will always hold fish of all species.

Walleye are also abundant here with the size again a little on the small size. In the chain, there is current, which will vary at times. These current areas can be key for walleye as well as the cribs. Jigs and live bait work the best in the open rocks and weeds, but once cribs are located, slip bobbers would be my choice. Bright colored jigs in the 1/16th to 1/8th ounce are sufficient.

Northern pike are common in the shallow weeds. They tend to run in the 20"-low 30" range being the most common. Use small bucktails and spinner baits in white or bright colors with gold or brass blades and you can have a great deal of fun catching them.

Muskies are also common here. This is a shallow fishery with the weed edges usually in the 5-7' range. Bucktails and top water work well here and in the fall cranks and jerk baits are the favorites again in bright colors. In the last 3 years some nice tigers have been showing up in the mid to upper 40's. This lake can be a good action lake at times for muskies but it definitely has trophy potential.

There are both Large and Smallmouth here but in relatively small numbers, most of which are caught by accident.

The chain is all one system, but at times the upper part being Moens, Second and Third Lake and the lower being Fourth and Fifth Lake can be very different. Do not be afraid if you are fishing one section and not doing well move to the other section and you may see substantial difference in the action. Remember current is the key.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

If you like dark shallow water then the Moens Chain is for you! This is the darkest body of water that I fish. That being said, chartreuse and orange really excel out here.

This five lake chain is made up of 5 fairly small lakes. This is another body of water that is hard to make a bad cast in. Virtually the entire shoreline will hold fish. There are also a few rock bars on this lake that produce some very nice fish every year.

Because the water is so dark I keep my presentation very simple. I really like bucktails out here. Whenever I am fishing the Moens chain someone in the boat is always throwing a bucktail. I like a bigger profile tail out here and the Mepps Marabou really seems to excel. If the fish are not interested in bucktails then try topwaters. I like Topraiders and Hawg Wobblers. My 3rd choice would be shallow running crank baits.  Flat sided baits that give off a LOT of flash seem to work the best out here. Shallow Raiders in bright colors are my number one choice.


Lake Name: Pelican Lake / Oneida County Wisconsin

  • Location: Pelican Lake Wisconsin Southeast of Rhinelander on Highway 45
  • Accessibility: 3 good boat landings east west & south shorelines
  • Accommodations: Resorts & Campgrounds
  • Surface Water Area: 3585 Acres
  • Shoreline: 13 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 39 Feet
  • Water Color: Clear
  • Lake Type: Drainage
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 40% Sand 30% Muck 20% Gravel 10% Rubble
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Musky, Walleye, Northern Pike, Panfish (Crappie Perch, Bluegills)
  • Secondary Game Fish Species: Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

Pelican Lake is the largest lake in Oneida County and is a very diverse fishery. It has good numbers and size of panfish.

Bluegills, perch and crappies are the panfish of choice here. Pelican has expansive reed flats, which offer great cover for the panfish. Concentrate on the sections that also have cabbage mixed in and you will up your odds. Some ice catches of perch can be taken in the winter off the edges of the weeds and the edges of the many rock piles and reefs.

Walleye are also common but the size has slipped a bit in the past few years but some quality fish are still taken every year. I would concentrate on the weed edges early in the year. Later in the season the fish will drop off during the day and move into the weeds I the evening. The many rock reefs are also a good bet. Jigs and slip bobbers work well here. I use 1/8th ounce jigs but wind and depth may require a larger jig. You need to maintain bottom contact.

Pike are also here in good numbers and size. Every year some upper 30"to 40" pike are caught. Bucktails and Spinner baits in white or orange with gold or painted blades work well. The weeds will produce pike but the larger fish tend to be deeper.

The musky fishing is good here with fish of all sizes, but pelican still produces upper 40's to 50" class fish annually. In the spring, bucktails and twitch baits shine in the new weed growth areas. As the season progresses fish will start to move out onto the reefs. Cranks, bucktails, jerkbaits and top water work here. Pelican can be a fun top water bite with some hogs showing themselves. I like oranges and perch patterns in all baits here. Bass are also common.

Largemouth can be caught off the docks using jigs and in the reeds with spinners and buzz baits. Smallmouth tend to on the rocks closer to deep water. Look around the islands and the reefs with cranks and tubes. Top water will also work in the evenings. This is a Bass sleeper. Pelican is a fun fishery but you need to use caution when running the lake as there are several prop hazards most of which are marked.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

I have a Love/Hate relationship with Pelican Lake. This lake is capable of producing a 40 lb fish but the fishing pressure can be somewhat intimidating. Every time I visit this body of water I see fish, and usually some big ones. However these fish are some of the most educated in Oneida County.

That being said, in order to be successful out here you must think outside the box. The great looking cabbage on Pelican can get the best of you. Don't make that mistake. If the fish are not going in the cabbage, get out of the weeds and hit the rock and sand structure on this lake.

Most fish that visit my boat from Pelican come from the rock structure. Keep your boat in the 12-14 foot range. Bait selection can be as simple as Mepps Musky Killers and topwater lures. Some other baits to consider are Depth Raiders, glide baits such as a Reef Hawg, and of course the home lake favorite, the Suick. If the rocks don't produce, I have also caught fishing fishing the bald sand structure on this body of water.  Fish the sand slightly shallower than you would the rocks, but feel free to use the same lures. Bottom line on this lake is DO NOT stay in the weeds if they are not producing.


Lake Name: Thompson Lake

  • Location: Oneida County / Southeast of Rhinelander on Highway C
  • Accessibility: Boat landing off of North Shore Drive
  • Accommodations: Resorts, Campground
  • Surface Water Area: 411 Acres
  • Shoreline: 6.7 Miles
  • Maximum Depth: 30 Feet
  • Water Color: Stained
  • Lake Type: Drainage
  • Littoral Bottom Structure: 55% Sand 25% Muck 15% Gravel 5% Rubble
  • Primary Game Fish Species: Musky, Walleye, Northern Pike, Panfish (Crappie, Perch, Bluegill )
  • Secondary Game Fish Species:  Largemouth & Smallmouth Bass

Fishing Tips:

Multi Specie tips from Scott Biscobing of Hodag Guide Service

Lake Thompson is a popular vacation spot with several resorts on the water.

Panfish are abundant here but run small. It is a great place to introduce kids to fishing. Just hook up some red worms on a hook with a bobber and find some weeds and the panfish will show up.

Thompson has a nice mix of rocks, weeds, and cribs. I would concentrate on the rocks for walleye, especially the main reef that has weeds on top. Start deep and move shallower I the evening. Jigs and live bait work well here. The cribs with slip bobbers will also produce walleye as well as some of the larger panfish.

Musky are here in good numbers with some quality fish in the upper 40's available. Bucktails and jerkbaits work well here in a perch pattern. In the summer, a good top water bite takes place in the morning and just before and after dark.

The pike here are not as abundant but tend to run a bit larger that the average. Small bucktails and spine baits are the ticket.

Work the slop with top water and the docks with jigs for largemouth. The bays all have nice weed beds in them. The rock are marked but use caution when running this lake.

This lake does see a fair amount of recreational traffic so early and late are your best bet.

Musky tips from John Stellflue of Oneida Esox Guide Service

Lake Thompson is another stained water lake that has a LOT of fish in it and some bigger fish. This is one lake that I like to fish the shallow weeds. I have found fish in this lake as shallow as 18-24 inches of water. Normally I tend to stay away from the weeds if at all possible, but this lake has a really good weed bite and I always start with the weeds when fishing here.

I like slow moving topwaters like Hawg Wobblers out here. Bucktails and dive and rise jerkbaits also work out here. You really can't go wrong with any lure that is Black and Orange.  One of my favorite is the black and orange Mepps Magnum.

If the fish are really slow try a spinner bait in the weeds. A lift and fall retrieve can usually get them to go out here if the fishing is tough. There is a good amount of lily pads on this lake and the muskies will indeed hide in the pads. Casting a spinner bait up into the pads can produce some good action.

One thing to remember is that Lake Thompson is a VERY popular lake with some very nice resorts on it so the fishing pressure and boating pressure can be pretty heavy during the summer peak.

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